Tag Archives: repositories

Scholarly Commons Hits 1 Million Downloads

12 Oct

Three years ago this month, the Scholarly Commons went live. Supporting Cornell’s School of Hotel Administration, it’s the second open access digital repository that I manage, and was both the biggest project of the post-consolidation HLM Digital Projects Group and the justification of our expansion from two people to three.

And in August, we recorded our one millionth full-text download.

Hitting that milestone in less than three years is kind of mind-boggling, but we’ve been ridiculously successful in this endeavor. We have papers from 70% of SHA’s faculty, we are now the point of dissemination for all publications from SHA Centers and Institutes… and folks are demonstrably reading this stuff, too.

Thanks go out to Sara Palmer, who does the lion’s share of the work on this repo, to her predecessor Chubing Tripepi, and to Steve Gollnick who helped get things off the ground while keeping DC@ILR uploads on track. (It’s worth noting that Sara and Steve won the Cornell University Library Outstanding Performance award behind this work.)

It’s been a helluva ride, and I’m looking forward to the future.

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Stuff and happenings

23 Sep

Three items of note:

First, there’s a little more than 24 hours left in the SLA Board of Directors election. If you can vote and haven’t yet, do so! If you have, thanks for stepping up to make the Association stronger. And in case anyone’s new to this blog, I am running for President-Elect, so please throw some consideration my way.

Second, I wrote a long post over at Cornell University Library’s Digital Scholarship and Preservation Services blog about the Repository Executive Group. (For those of you who prefer brevity, I posted in the CUL DSPS blog about RepoExec.*) Chairing that committee made up a large part of my fellowship work, and I cover a lot of what we did in that post.

Finally, if you haven’t been following the #teamharpy case, I recommend checking out the blog that nina de jesus and Lisa Rabey have set up, which both explains the case and lets you donate to their defense. Also very much worth highlighting is their call for witnesses. It is a deeply messed up situation that they’re in, and I admire their actions and their courage. They have my support, and deserve yours.

So, that’s what’s up. A lot going on, and in less than 36 hours I’m going to find out a lot more about my next three years. Be well, folks.

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* Though, if you prefer breveity, you probably won’t like the post.

NYLA: Repositories and Open Access

30 Sep

Last week, I got to go to my first New York Library Association conference, and it was a blast. As I mentioned previously, Amy Buckland and I gave our workshop on digital repository strategies and practice. It’s a workshop I love, because no matter how many times we’ve given it it’s never the same: Amy and I always have new experiences to relate, and the groups we work with are always so different that their questions and insights are new and revelatory each time.

Items of note this go-round: it was the first time that just about everyone in the room seemed to have adequate or nigh-adequate staffing for their repository projects — hallelujah! — and the folks running Digital Commons @Brockport are doing some amazing things.

I also had the honor of sitting on a panel with Amy and Jenica Rogers, talking about Open Access in scholarly publishing. We went with a simple format: we put what we hoped would be a provocative statement up on a slide, and then got a discussion going with the audience about it. There were six statements in total, and if you read Jenica’s blog*, you’ve likely seen them already. I’ll reproduce them here because they got great discussion at NYLA, and great discussion on her blog, and I’m curious to see if we can pull off a great discussion trifecta. Or hat-trick.  Or similar sports metaphor for something happening three times. In any case, here they are:

  1. A child born today will use nothing but open access materials for research in college.

  2. Textbook companies will go out of business as faculty realize they can write, compile, and publish their own customized open course texts.

  3. Future discussions of the quality of library collections will focus not on the collections a library owns, but on the collections a library creates.

  4. The adoption of open access collections will obviate proprietary discovery layers.

  5. It is irresponsible for federally-funded researchers not to make their work available in an open format.

  6. True change in the scholarly publishing system will come from smaller liberal arts colleges, and not the big guys.

Oh, and Amy provided what’s probably the best opening slide ever.

So, discuss in the comments if you have a mind to, or head over to Jenica’s and jump in the discussion there. In any case, I’d love to hear your thoughts.

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* And if you don’t, why the hell not?

Come hear Amy Buckland (also me) talk repositories at NYLA!

16 Aug

Amy Buckland and I will be presenting a pre-conference CE workshop on digital repositories at the New York Library Association’s Annual Conference this year. The date is September 25, and here’s the low-down:

Digital Repositories

Sponsor: ASLS
Half Day PM  2:00 PM – 5:00 PM
This workshop addresses key issues surrounding the creation, maintenance, and cultivation of digital repositories. Drawing on the latest literature, case studies, and personal experiences, speakers lead a discussion that covers planning the digital repository, selecting a methodology for its establishment, populating it with content, marketing it to the library’s constituencies, and meeting the various challenges and questions along the way. Participants have the opportunity to bring their own experiences to bear, as well as engage in group discussions regarding how to get the most out of a digital repository.

Presenters:
Jim DelRosso is the Digital Projects Coordinator for Cornell University’s Hospitality, Labor, and Management Library, where he is responsible for such projects as DigitalCommons@ILR, the digital repository for Cornell’s ILR School. A digital librarian since 2009, Jim is also the President for the Upstate New York Chapter of the Special Libraries Association, and has served as the Communication & Social Media Chair for the SLA’s Academic Division.

Amy Buckland is the eScholarship, ePublishing & Digitization Coordinator at McGill University Library, where she is responsible for scholarly communication, publishing initiatives, and making rare items from special collections available to the world through digitization. She loves information almost as much as Fluevog shoes, and thinks academic libraryland is ripe for a revolution. You can find her online at informingthoughts.com and in most social networks as Jambina.

So, if you’re heading to NYLA, or just thinking about it, give us a look. We’ll be entertaining and informative!

DigitalCommons@ILR Hits 5 Million Downloads

6 Sep

I’m just gonna leave this here…

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Bringing the Workplace to the World
DigitalCommons@ILR Hits 5 Million Downloads

ITHACA, N.Y. (Sept. 6, 2012) – A digital repository that provides free access to some of the most important documents in the world of work has hit a major milestone: 5 million downloads, from users all over the world.

screenshotDigitalCommons@ILR features the work of the faculty and researchers at Cornell’s ILR School, as well as non-Cornell content — and its use is soaring.

“The surge in downloads this past year reflects a growing interest in workplace issues,” said Jim DelRosso, digital projects coordinator for the Martin P. Catherwood Library, which has run DigitalCommons@ILR for the ILR School since the digital repository’s creation in 2004. “More and more, these issues are part of the discourse in this country and abroad, and of our debates over politics and policy. The heavy use of DigitalCommons@ILR is a testament to the quality of its content.”

The repository hosts 16,000 workplace-related documents on a huge range of topics. Its collections include articlesimpact briefs, and other papers — both published and unpublished — from ILR faculty and researchers, making the repository an invaluable internal resource for faculty looking to provide universal access to their scholarship.

“The ILR School was founded in 1945 to advance the world of work through research and outreach to the community,” said Catherwood Director Curtis Lyons. “The Internet and DigitalCommons@ILR has given us an unprecedented opportunity to push the research out to global practitioners to fulfill our core mission and raise the profile of our unique institution.”

Most visitors arrive at DigitalCommons@ILR through Google, and the repository sees heavy use from practitioners as well as academics worldwide. The most frequently downloaded document is a paper co-authored by ILR Associate Prof. Jack Goncalo, titled, “The Bias Against Creativity: Why People Desire But Reject Creative Ideas.”

DigitalCommons@ILR also includes key workplace documents curated by expert Cornell librarians, collections of collective bargaining agreements and other digital resources. So far in 2012, DigitalCommons@ILR has recorded more than 1.3 million downloads — slightly more than were recorded in all of 2011 and almost twice as many as in 2010.

To learn more
Visit library.cornell.edu and Catherwood Library’s website, and check outDigitalCommons@ILR.

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Original release found here. I can probably provide some other commentary, but right now I’ll just say two things: this is awesome, and as of today we’re at 5,265,492.

Webinar links and reflections

18 Oct

Last week’s webinar seemed to go very well. It’s a whole different experience for me, making a presentation in a format which makes it impossible for me to see or hear the audience. There were apparently 83 people in attendance, and the feedback I’ve received both from bepress and via email has been positive.

Plus, my sign totally worked:

If you’re interested in what I had to say about getting faculty involved in a digital repository, but weren’t able to attend, there are a few ways you can check it out. First, here are the slides from Prezi:

Or, you could watch the video of slides with voice-over:

Both of those, plus a PDF of the slides, are available here.

Overall, I’m pretty pleased with how this went. I probably talked too long,* and so we didn’t have as much time for questions as I’d like.** But I thought the questions I did get were good, and I’m hopeful that folks might send me more.

I enjoy talking about this stuff, and I try to frame the conversation in terms of relationships: both between the folks who work at libraries and the folks who make content, and between the material within the repositories and its users/creators.

Back when I spoke at an IR Day in April, the one piece of negative commentary I received was that I didn’t use the DigitalCommons software at any point in my presentation. Frankly, I can’t imagine giving that kind of presentation outside of training folks within my library or school to use the software, and one of the reasons I’m glad give webinars or presentations in conjunction with bepress is that I don’t have to frame my presentation in a DigitalCommons-specific way.***

I try to make this stuff generally applicable, regardless of what kind of repository software you use (and maybe even to digital library projects beyond repositories). Hopefully, I succeeded this time around.

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* SHOCKING.
** I can’t really fault bepress for cutting things off right at an hour, though; I actually needed to end the webinar and start a chat reference shift.
*** I did talk a bit about the upload interface, I believe, but even then I tried to frame in the context of how much you could expect folks outside the library to contribute to repository workflow.

IR Day Retrospective

24 Jun

It’s a short one, I must confess; a paragraph and some links.

The event was very well put together, and attended by folks who were very cool and asked great questions. I even ended up getting a tour of the Thurgood Marshall Law Library, which was great. On the whole I thought it was a solid event, and the feedback I received was positive.

Now, links!

I wish I’d written this stuff up sooner, when then event was fresher in my mind. Next week I’ll try to get to SLA, before that fades entirely.